Titanic

Review

No disrespect but a reminder of folly

If it seems mildly disrespectful to stage an all-singing, all-dancing musical about the death of 1,500 people, don't be put off.

Yes, of course you know the ending. And yes, images from That Film are hard to shake off. But this version of the Titanic tragedy is still a poignant reminder of mankind's arrogance and assuming that bigger and faster are always better.

Humdrum Amdram stage it imaginatively with virtually no set. The difficulty of portraying umpteen locations aboard the ship is solved with an inventive use of authentic-looking photos projected behind the cast. Only afterwards do you realise they haven't used a single drop of water. A bewildering array of characters settles into several interweaving stories of love, ambition and technological advancement. It seems strange for one third class couple to get engaged on the strength of only a dozen lines of dialogue, it's no odder than that Di Caprio-Winslet romance. With such a large cast, you hardly get to know who's with who before they hit the lifeboats. Even so, the anguish of leaving loved ones to die is perfectly captured in the tear jerking We'll Meet Tomorrow.

The singing is superb and the band don't miss a note. The only thing that jars is sometimes not being able to hear cast members above an incessant underscore.